Blog

It’s Time for the Corps to Go Back to the Drawing Board on the ACF

It’s Time for the Corps to Go Back to the Drawing Board on the ACF

Written by Mitch Reid, Alabama Rivers Alliance, and Dan Tonsmeire, Apalachicola Riverkeeper The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is one of the nation’s primary river managers, and its actions have profound effects on the nation’s rivers, coasts, and wetlands. It is also a controversial federal agency. Over the past 200 years, the Corps has dredged more than 15,000 miles of rivers for navigation and im ...[Read More]

Learning from the Lives Along the River

Learning from the Lives Along the River

Originally Published by The McKnight Foundation, November 10, 2016 Written by Mark Muller, Mississippi River Program Director Given the intense election coverage of the past few months, you would be forgiven if you missed the news of some big environmental catastrophes. Several weeks ago, Cedar Rapids endured a massive flood. In the month prior, flooding in Baton Rouge caused the area’s largest na ...[Read More]

People Over Pipelines & Fracked Gas

People Over Pipelines & Fracked Gas

Written by Maya van Rossum, Delaware Riverkeeper Network Interstate fracked gas pipelines are cutting through people’s lives at an increasing rate.  The onslaught of shale gas extraction happening in Pennsylvania and other shale bearing states is resulting in an explosion of interstate fracked gas pipelines that are cutting through our front yards, our back yards, our farms, our forests, our creek ...[Read More]

Water Bill Wastes Billions

Originally Published by Taxpayers for Common Sense, September 9, 2016 Weekly Wastebasket Volume: XXI No. 36 Written by Steve Ellis, Taxpayers for Common Sense Taxpayer alert: Be prepared to shell out some more cash for big water projects, courtesy of the U.S. Senate. A few months ago, we wrote about the big U.S. Army Corps of Engineers water projects bill introduced in the Senate (Water Bill Redux ...[Read More]

Historic Florida, Georgia water war decisions will impact entire nation

Historic Florida, Georgia water war decisions will impact entire nation

By Dan Tonsmeire, Apalachicola Riverkeeper A vital piece of Florida’s economy and livelihoods are hinging on historic actions this year by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and the Supreme Court of the United States. It’s a continuation of the Florida-Georgia water war — one that’s been going on for decades. But this year matters more than any other; the Supreme Court and the Corps will set precede ...[Read More]

Five Birds that Benefit from Living Shorelines

Living shorelines encompass a range of shoreline stabilization techniques along estuarine coasts, bays, sheltered coastlines, and tributaries.

By Marisa Escudero, Water Resources Manager, NWF Think of your last visit to the shore. Can you remember the smell of the ocean, the breeze in the air? What’s missing? The birds. It’s hard to imagine these serene paradises without wildlife, especially the harmonious calls from our feathered friends. However, man-made erosion structures built to protect shorelines, such as seawalls and bulkheads, t ...[Read More]

Help Save Superman’s Home!

Help Save Superman’s Home!

By Marisa Escudero, Water Resources Manager, National Wildlife Federation The New Madrid Levee Project is a proposal by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to build a new 60 foot high, quarter mile long levee and two huge pumping plants along the Mississippi River in southeast Missouri. This project will destroy this rare river-floodplain connection, threaten the safety of low-income river communitie ...[Read More]

Comprehensive Flood Risk Management for the Upper Mississippi?

Comprehensive Flood Risk Management for the Upper Mississippi?

By Olivia Dorothy, American Rivers In August, the Mississippi River Commission will be conducting their low water inspection on the Upper Mississippi River and on August 11 will be holding an invitation-only roundtable to discuss flood risk management on the Upper Mississippi River. Anyone who works on the Upper Mississippi River might ask, “Wait, didn’t we do a comprehensive flood risk management ...[Read More]